Norwegian Seafood Council

Every day throughout the year 37 million meals of seafood from Norway are served worldwide, of this 10 million meals consist of Norwegian salmon. The Norwegian Seafood Council (NSC) strives to make that number even greater and to ensure that people from all corners of the world know that the best seafood comes from Norway.

The NSC’s head office is located in Tromsø and it employs representatives in Sweden, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Brazil, Japan, China, Singapore, Russia and the USA.

The NSC is a key player in the safeguarding of the Norwegian fisheries industry’s positive image. The NSC engages in active information work and cooperates closely with media, NGOs, various interest groups, the fishery industry and Norwegian authorities. To ensure reliable and updated information regarding Norwegian seafood, NSC works in close cooperation with expert bodies and Norwegian authorities.

The NSC is the industry’s key source of information for tariff rates, product classifications, import quotas and other conditions relating to market access. The NSC acts in an advisory capacity to the Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs and other authorities, and is responsible for the approval of exporters.

The NSC provides statistics and analyses of Norwegian and international trade relating to seafood. Presentation of market information is important, and the NSC runs trade seminars as well as presenting information online and through press releases.

The Norwegian Seafood Council hosts 13 websites in different languages presenting consumer information such as seafood recipes and seafood facts. These sites can be reached from www.seafoodfromnorway.com and www.seafood.no., the B2B websites where trade information and press releases are published.

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