Norwegian Environment Agency (Miljødirektoratet)

Norwegian Environment Agency plays a key role in preserving nature, reducing pollution, and shaping Norwegian environmental policy.

We were established on 1 July 2013 as a result of the merger of the Norwegian Climate and Pollution Agency and the Norwegian Directorate for Nature Management.

The Norwegian Environment Agency is the largest agency under the Ministry of the Environment with about 700 employees, most of whom work at our offices in Trondheim and Oslo.

The sections that are primarily responsible for nature management are located in Trondheim, while the sections that are mainly responsible for climate and pollution issues are in Oslo.

The Norwegian Nature Inspectorate (SNO) is part of the agency, with employees at more than sixty local offices.

Managing Norwegian nature and preventing pollution

The Norwegian Environment Agency is instrumental in nature management and pollution control.

Our functions are to monitor the state of the environment, convey environment-related information, exercise authority, oversee and guide regional and municipal authorities, collaborate with the authorities of relevant sectors, act as an expert advisor, and assist in international environmental efforts.

Our objectives

The Norwegian government and the Norwegian Parliament determine the ambitions of our environmental policy. The environmental policy has been divided into various fields, each with specific national objectives.

The Norwegian Environment Agency has been assigned key tasks with a view to  achieving the national objectives in the following fields:

  • a stable climate and strengthened adaptability
  • biodiverse forests
  • unspoilt mountain landscapes
  • lush wetlands
  • a toxic-free environment
  • an active outdoor life
  • well managed cultural landscapes
  • living oceans and coasts
  • healthy rivers and lakes
  • effective waste and recycling
  • clean air and less noise pollution


Norwegian Environment Agency

PO Box 5672 Sluppen,

NO-7485 Trondheim, Norway

Tel: + 47 03400 / + 47 73 58 05 00

Fax: + 47 73 58 05 01



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