The salmon louse genome has been sequenced

Work on sequencing the sea louse genome has reached astage where it will be possible to use the results in the beginning of 2011. By then the genome is fully sequenced and partially analyzed, making it possible to utilise it in the work towards developing vaccines and new medications against salmon lice. As the salmon louse has developed resistance against most chemicals used for delousing at fish farms, this is an important step towards developing alternative approaches.

The genome of the salmon louse consists of hundreds of millions of nucleic acids. In order to map the genome, it is necessary to determine the order of these nucleic acids by sequencing them. This is done by splitting the genome into millions of pieces, which are then individually sequenced. Once this has been done, it is then necessary to reconstruct the genome by putting the bits together in what could be described as a giant jigsaw puzzle. When the puzzle is completed, the genome is mapped. By the end of 2010 the genome of the salmon louse has been fully sequenced, and the puzzling of the puzzle has begun.

Good results
Natural genetic variation can make it difficult to put together a genome. Often you end up with many short sequences that cannot be united into longer pieces. However, preliminary results of the sequencing of the sea louse genome indicate that the sequence pieces will be relatively long, making it easier to reconstruct the genome.


- The reason that we are achieving such good results in this project in comparison with other comparable projects is probably that we have sequenced an inbred line of lice with highly reduced genetic variation, explains Rasmus Skern-Mauritzen, the researcher managing the sequencing project.

A useful resource for researchers and businesses
Once the genome has been mapped, it will be used to develop vaccines and chemical delousing agents. A genome database will save researchers valuable time when developing new delousing methods. The good sequencing and initial analysis results mean that we can start using the sequencing data in research even before the genome has been fully mapped. Therefore, after a quality control that will be completed shortly, the results will be made available to researchers and industry working on finding solutions to problems with salmon lice.

About the project
The salmon licee genome is being mapped by researchers from The Institute of Marine Research, the University of Bergen and Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics. The project has been funded by The Institute of Marine Research, Marine Harvest and The Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund.

Associated companies:


Related news

Latest news

Nemko Publishes Short Notes on China

Nemko has published a some updates related to China and new initiatives regarding standards, product safety and cyber security. 

Technip and FMC Technologies Shareholders Approve Business Combination

FMC Technologies Inc. and Technip S.A. have announced that the companies' respective shareholders have voted to approve the proposed business combination of Technip and FMC Technologies.

Nordsild

The fishing vessel "North Herring" belonging to Norsild Havfiske AS with factory from Melbu Systems was in August ready for cod fishing.

One of the Strongest Earthquakes in New Zealand in 200 years

NORSAR reports that New Zealand’s South Island was struck by one of the strongest earthquakes the country has observed in the past 200 years November 13, 2016.

Jotne Subsea Gas Lift for Balder Field

In April 2015, Jotne E&P was awarded an EPC contract to build the subsea gas lift manifold for Exxon Mobil on the Balder Field.

Jotne Awarded Contract for Subsea Protection Structure

In January 2016, Jotne E&P was awarded a contract for the delivery of a subsea protection structure and GRP cover for a Xmas tree at Balder field. The contract was awarded by Ocean Installer.

UiB and CMR in high-tech collaboration

Students from UiB last month joined an experiment with an ultra-high-speed camera. This was a part of the troubleshooting of the Field Kelvin Probe currently under development.

Hatteland Display at International Workboat Show 2016

Hatteland Display are highlighting its diverse portfolio of maritime displays and panel computers on its booth (#1658) at the International Workboat Show 2016 (IWBS 2016) this week.

Servogear Announces Upcoming Events

Servogear announces a busy end of November, beginning of December. They will be participating at important international exhibitions.