Nobel Prize in Physiology goes to Norwegian researchers

Norwegian husband-wife team Edvard and May-Britt Moser have been awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology for their discovery of grid cells in the brain.

The two carry out their research from their laboratory at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. They are sharing the award with US-British researcher John O'Keefe, with whom they have collaborated.

Cutting-edge brain research

“This year’s Nobel Laureates have discovered a positioning system, an ‘inner GPS’ in the brain that makes it possible to orient ourselves in space, demonstrating a cellular basis for higher cognitive function,” reads the announcement from the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

Back in 1971, John O'Keefe discovered “place cells” in the brain that he postulated were building up a coordinate system that lends the brain its sense of direction and perception of position in space.

“The discoveries of John O´Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser have solved a problem that has occupied philosophers and scientists for centuries – how does the brain create a map of the space surrounding us?” the Assembly’s statement continues.

Funding from Research Council of Norway

The Research Council is proud to have supported the research for which May-Britt and Edvard Moser have been awarded the Nobel Prize. Among other things, the Research Council has provided funding for two Norwegian Centres of Excellence (SFF) at NTNU headed by the Mosers. The first, the Centre for the Biology of Memory, was established in 2002 with Edvard Moser as director. Read more about the centre here.

In 2013 a new SFF centre related to this research was launched. The Centre for Neural Computation (CNC) is headed by May-Britt Moser and has just begun its 10-year funding period under the SFF scheme. Read more about the CNC here.

The Research Council extends it heartiest congratulations to the NTNU couple on winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. “The Mosers’ research group has brought Norwegian research into the world’s most elite circles. Their group fulfils all the criteria for excellence in research,” says Arvid Hallén, Director General of the Research Council.

Associated companies:


 

Related news

Latest news

Jotne Subsea Gas Lift for Balder Field

In April 2015, Jotne E&P was awarded an EPC contract to build the subsea gas lift manifold for Exxon Mobil on the Balder Field.

Jotne Awarded Contract for Subsea Protection Structure

In January 2016, Jotne E&P was awarded a contract for the delivery of a subsea protection structure and GRP cover for a Xmas tree at Balder field. The contract was awarded by Ocean Installer.

UiB and CMR in high-tech collaboration

Students from UiB last month joined an experiment with an ultra-high-speed camera. This was a part of the troubleshooting of the Field Kelvin Probe currently under development.

Hatteland Display at International Workboat Show 2016

Hatteland Display are highlighting its diverse portfolio of maritime displays and panel computers on its booth (#1658) at the International Workboat Show 2016 (IWBS 2016) this week.

Servogear Announces Upcoming Events

Servogear announces a busy end of November, beginning of December. They will be participating at important international exhibitions.

Teamtec and ANDRITZ Cooperation

ANDRITZ and TeamTec have signed a cooperation agreement for worldwide marketing of the SeaSOx exhaust gas cleaning system for the maritime industry. 

Export Credit Norway looking for Norway's Best Exporter

Export Credit Norway  has now opened the nomination process for the 2017 Export Award, searching the Norwegian exporter of the year. 

Global Economic Outlook

7 December, Oslo Chamber of Commerce invites to a session with insightful updates on the Norwegian and international economy.

Rebuilding for Hydrogen

M/Y “Che Guevara”, previously owned by Gaddafi, will be converted to run on hydrogen. Greenstat will lead the project and are seeking partners.