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Eat more fish and seafood from Norway

Health benefits of eating Norwegian Seafood outweigh any risks. That is the main conclusion in the report from the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (SCF), which was presented today.

Health benefits of eating Norwegian Seafood outweigh any risks. That is the main conclusion in the report from the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food Safety (SCF), which was presented today. The Committee recommends that to eat four or more fish and seafood meals each week and both fatty and lean fish should be included in the diet.

This is good news for the fish-loving people of Norway. The consumption of seafood in Norway is among the highest in Europe with a consumption of 24 kg per capita. Seafood is also important for the Norwegian economy and Norwegian Seafood is exported to 150 countries worldwide.

The Scientific Committee for Food Safety weighed the nutritional benefits against possible risks and developed dietary advice for the public on consumption of fish, with particular reference to oily fish. The report is based on more than 300 scientific analyses and studies.

The SCF concludes that “no realistic consumption of fish and other seafood in Norway can lead to harmful intakes of food substances. This is also true for children”. Simply put, the health advantage from eating fish outweighs any risk. “A low intake of the marine Omega-3 fatty acids can result in a loss of their recognised health-promoting effects”, concludes the report.

The report is in line with similar studies conducted in other countries such as United Kingdom and Denmark.

The SCF also concludes that it is now well documented that fish in general is good for the health. Consumption of particularly fatty fish slows down the development of and prevents cardiovascular diseases. The SCF therefore recommends an increase in consumption of fatty types of fish, especially for those who eat little fatty fish today and for those of the population who eat the least amount of fish. Studies show that the number of deaths due to heart attacks (about 7000 per year) can be reduced by 4 percent – or 300 per year – if Norwegians on average consume one extra fish meal a week.

Omega-3 fatty acids have a favourable effect on pregnancy and foetal development, including brain development, and oily fish is therefore good for pregnant and nursing women. However, the SCF believes that this group should not eat more than two meals with fatty fish a week, and adds – based on what we know today about young women’s fish consumption – that there is no reason to suppose risk since this group only eat 0.5 meals of oily fish a week.

Contact person: Information Adviser Inger-Gunn Sande,
tlf. (+47) 77 60 33 57/ mobile (+47) 975 63 905.