Life science

Norway’s capital region is paving the way for groundbreaking biomedical discoveries within the life sciences of cancer research, neuroscience and marine bio-innovation.

Norway and Oslo’s strength lies in the quality of the research conducted and the access to one of Europe’s most highly educated workforces. Whilst cancer research is well known, major advances have been made in other areas as well. In cardiovascular research, three of the seminal trials – on beta-blocker, ace inhibitors and cholesterol lowering drugs – were performed here. Similarly four of the key discoveries in neuroscience were made by Oslo-based scientists. Therefore Norway’s strategic focus is on those areas where Norwegian research is of the very highest calibres:

• Cancer diagnostics and treatment
• Neuroscience
• Cardiovascular
• Immunology
• Blue and green biotech
• Functional genomics

Seventy percent of all biotechnological research in Norway is done in the Oslo region. With its clinical and research hospitals, numerous research institutes within life sciences and close international links, the Oslo region is well positioned both with respect to public private cooperation and international collaboration. Infrastructural strengths in health registers – unique worldwide, dating back 50 years – clinical trials and public support also lay a solid foundation for future growth.

Life science activities and initiatives are taking thriving steps – experiencing success regionally, and internationally. Oslo Teknopol and the various partners and strategic alliances with this exciting area offer many interesting opportunities ahead.

Oslo: A Concentration of Bio-activities
The research environment in the region is closely connected to the medical, educational, business, and governmental infrastructure, creating the basis for a synergy of success.

Gaustadbekkdalen in Oslo is one of the most concentrated physical campuses for bio-medical activity in the Nordic countries. The anchor is the close cooperation between Rikshospitalet, Norway’s largest and most specialized hospital, and the neighbouring University of Oslo. Also located here is a large division of SINTEF, the Nordic countries’ largest independent applied research organization, the Oslo Innovation Center and the GlaxoSmithKline Innovation Center. Not far from Gaustadbekkdalen, Montebello is home to the world famous Radium Cancer Hospital, with a new Radiation Center, and a new science park to enhance the recently launched Oslo Cancer Cluster.

In a beautiful countryside setting to the South-East of Oslo, the Ås campus is the focal point of green and blue biotech research. The campus includes the University of Life Science, Nofima Mat, Bioforsk, Bioparken and the Nofima Marin research institute. Ås is also home to CIGENE, a FUGE center providing integrated genetics research services to other institutes.

Oslo Teknopol & Oslo Bio Network
As the business-development agency in the Oslo region, Oslo Teknopol has a focus on facilitating success within designated key business sectors and their individual companies, institutions and organizations, with the biotech – life science industry being of particular importance.

An important initiative within the life science sector in the greater Oslo region is the Oslo Bio Network, a collaborative network of stakeholders from the life science cluster that is committed to long term growth through marketing, initiating and facilitating development projects, and international collaboration. Oslo Teknopol is secretariat,
www.oslo.teknopol.no

Related articles

Latest articles

Norwegian Seafood Enjoyed Worldwide

Norway exported 2.6 million tonnes of seafood 2015. That represented more than 11 billion main courses. But the number of meals containing Norwegian seafood is possibly in the order of more than 20 billion. Seafood is ofte...

Mother-Daughter Ship to Boost Short Sea Cargo

More goods will need to be transported by ship to meet stricter environmental guidelines. A Norwegian maritime cluster has found the answer in a ship-in-ship short sea cargo concept.

More Sustainable Fish Feeds

The Norwegian seafood industry is experimenting with new sustainable fish feeds like tree yeast and sandhoppers that won’t compete with the foods we eat and also help farm more fish.

Spotlight Tanzania: New Offshore Gas Opportunities

Africa is both promising and challenging. The Norwegian offshore industry is eyeing petroleum field developments in Tanzania for possible opportunities.

Norway's Future Green Fleet

A dramatic fall in battery costs and stricter emission regulations are spurring the Norwegian maritime to develop the most environmentally friendly fleet of coastal vessels.

The Fishy Biotech Future

There is something fishy about two of the Research Council’s six large projects under the new strategic initiative “Digital Life.”

Engineering Nanoparticles to Boost Oil

Norwegian scientists are combining nanotechnology with petroleum research to enhance recovery. In the future, even nanoparticles from trees could squeeze out more oil.

Ship Energy Efficiency: The Fourth Wave

Shipping has seen three waves of energy efficiency trends since 2007. The latest buzz is the Big Data revolution.

Sustainable Fish Farming Solutions: From Feed to Egg

The challenge of rising fish feed and sea lice costs is stimulating new sustainable technology solutions in Norwegian aquaculture. In the future, producers might raise salmon in egg-shaped offshore farms.