INTPOW - for a renewable future

There is a major focus on renewable energy at the highest levels of Norwegian government and industry, this in a country where the energy sources are many and there already is extensive experience within the energy sector. In order to build on this present strength and future possibilities, INTPOW (Norwegian Renewable Energy Partners) was established early in 2009 in an initiative taken in close cooperation between the energy industry and Norwegian authorities.

The core strength of the Norwegian energy sector lies in a high level of expertise combined with close cooperation, and INTPOW’s vision is to be a central part of this coordination. Founding partners include the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, the Norwegian Ministry of Trade and Industry, Statkraft, Agder Energi, Det Norske Veritas, Norconsult, Nexans Norway, Navita and Norsk Solkraft.

The success of the Norwegian petroleum network INTSOK was a major inspiration behind INTPOW, and the two organizations not only share the same location, but experience a synergy of information exchange. According to Managing Director Geir Elsebutangen, the possibilities are many; “It is INTPOW’s goal that the organization will function as a venue of communication for the renewable energy industry here in Norway, also including foreign energy companies – all aimed to contribute to increasing the competitive edge for member companies. We have already experienced interest for INTPOW member technology and implementation strategies within renewable energy, and believe that this is only the beginning of a successful process.”

Significant Potential
The global renewable energy sector – and market – is in a period of strong growth, something that will certainly continue for a long time to come. Key to optimizing both the positive environmental effect as well as the business possibilities involved will be the creation and strengthening of international strategic business alliances, and this again is where INTPOW seeks to lend its expertise.

The organization works to better understand the markets outside Norway, providing access to updated market information in international projects, and at the same time working to create and strengthen the chain of communication between the international sector and renewable energy activities in Norway.

It is the goal of INTPOW to function as an effective door opener for international energy projects and supply chains at home and abroad. Further, providing expertise regarding market penetration as well as area knowledge regarding suppliers of products and services within potential markets, as well as providing information in terms of business, regulatory considerations and the political situation relevant to the energy market.

100 Years of Renewable Energy
Norway is a country that has parlayed its century of experience within hydropower into a national energy network where nearly 100% of the national electricity requirements are supplied by this renewable resource. Norway’s main emphasis is on various aspects of hydropower generation due to the abundance of this natural resource.

Hydropower accounts for 96 % of total installed production capacity; with the average production capacity is estimated to 122 TWh per year. In 2000, hydropower production reached a record level of 143 TWh. Expertise and experience runs deep here within the hydroelectric sector, and INTPOW strongly believes that other countries with unexploited hydropower resources may benefit from the Norwegian experience of economic, environmental, technical and social aspects of hydropower development.

Renewable energy activity is strongly represented within INTPOW, and activity abounds. Statkraft is doing business in Norway and far beyond, including an agreement with Global Investment Holdings, a Turkish diversifed holding company regarding the transfer of hydropower projects to Statkraft. Other internationally active INTPOW members within hydropower include Agder Energi, BKK, SN Power, NTE and Trønder Energy where the capabilities of INTPOW partners are already utilized abroad.

Blowin’ in the Wind
Norway has a tremendous future capacity for producing wind power, and today this area of activity is a quickly developing energy technology. Offshore wind farm activity is an area of particular interest and this is a focus of Norwegian industry and research as more electricity producers are expanding into wind power.

Innovation is an important word, and that word is written all over the Sheringham Shoal (United Kingdom) project, a major initiative owned by StatoilHydro (50%) and Statkraft (50%) through the company Scira Offshore Energy Ltd. To be built between 17 and 23 kilometers from the coastline, the diamond shaped wind park will cover approximately 35 square kilometers, and consist of 88 wind turbines and two transformer attached to the foundations on the seabed. Each turbine mast will be approximately 80 meters high.

The Sheringham Shoal project, owned by StatoilHydro and Statkraft, will be a diamond shaped wind park built between 17 and 23 kilometres off the coast and consist of 88 wind turbines.
© Harald Pettersen / StatoilHydro


Here Comes the Sun
A number of INTPOW members have substantial involvement within solar power, an energy area that will increase in importance as solar cell technology and solar battery technology continue to improve in the future. The exchange of technology and the financial interaction between Norwegian companies and the international clients in this sector is creating a synergy of expansion as large international investors are continuing to take notice of the growing industrial base here as well as new technologies and growing R&D activities.

Norway has established itself as being in the forefront when it comes to photovoltaic (PV) solutions. A strong R&D environment produced cutting-edge solutions; and companies such as REC is a leader and the world’s largest producer of silicon materials for PV applications and holds all rights to its proprietary production technology. REC is also the world’s largest producer of PV wafers, and REC Silicon holds more than 20 approved or pending patents. Companies such as Norsk Solkraft have been successful in the fiercely competitive environment of the Middle East, and provide professional services and products to the international photovoltaic market.

Creating Value
By working to increase and strengthen potential for growth, export, and increased value creation through the continued internationalization of the renewable energy industry, INTPOW is positioned to assist both existing companies as well as establishment of new companies. An advantage of Norwegian industry in general and the renewable energy sector in particular is the close collaboration between education, R&D, and industry – facilitating a short time to market.

Through providing networking opportunities, market information and advice and client seminars and workshops, INTPOW aims to create greater values and develop new business opportunities, as well as strengthening the foundation for the further development of industry expertise and the recruitment of new talents.

The potential of the Norwegian energy industry is significant, and Norway has often been a pioneer, leading development in particular within the hydropower field for more than a hundred years. This background has set the stage for potential continued expansion of energy delivery beyond Norwegian borders, and INTPOW seeks to continue to capitalize on this potential for greater value creation will be through greater internationalization and increased cooperation between companies.

The synergy of communication within the INTPOW network increases the potential for members, as they have access to a considerable experience and knowledge base, which a company would find difficult to reach alone. The wide support from the Norwegian Government ensures that the vision of an environmentally sustainable society is well-grounded in the activities of INTPOW and its members. Commitment, innovation and a consistent view on a cleaner, more productive future can be found here at INTPOW.

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