ICT - going green and wireless

Norwegians are among the most technologically sophisticated people in the world and demand excellence and innovation. This has resulted in a highly educated and skilled ICT sector that delivers top of the line products and services to the whole world.

 User driven innovation at it’s best
In the average Norwegian household, the home computer is arguably the most common sight. According to Statistics Norway (SSB), 86% of Norwegian households currently have access to computers. Over a hundred thousand employees – almost 5% of the entire population – work within the ICT industries and, in 2007 alone, ICT goods totalling more than NOK 15 billion left Norwegian shores. Norwegians are among the most technologically sophisticated people in the world, and demand excellence and innovation.

 

Forefront of ICT security
With the dawn of the computer age that began nearly a half century ago, a new need arose simultaneously – the need for consistent ICT (Information & Communication Technology) security to protect individuals, companies, organizations and governments. This need has never been as apparent as it is today, with ICT a core part of how we do business, how we live, and how we communicate – in every part of modern society.

 

ICT – an integral part of societal security, Q&A with Minister Anne-Grethe Strøm-Erichsen
The Norwegian Minister of Defence Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen is educated as a computer engineer, and with twenty years private and public sector experience in computers and information technology in the fields of system development and management understands in depth the importance of ICT. Interviewed by Editor-in-Chief David John Smith; Minister Strøm-Erichsen looks at the importance of ICT in societal infrastructure and security.

 

Get smart – the green ICT revolution
The SMART 2020 report recently concluded that smarter technology use can reduce global carbon emissions by up to 15% and save EUR 500 billion in energy costs by 2020. So it was only natural that an environmentally conscious and ICT savvy country like Norway would embrace this message and incorporate it everything it does, whether it be smart buildings, smart transport, or smart grids.

 

Wireless future – the mobile tech cluster in Oslo
Norway’s challenging topography of vast mountainous ranges and remote Arctic territories has pushed the drive for new and advanced communication technologies to keep its scattered population connected. The country launched the world’s first automatic mobile net NMT 450 in 1981 and invented today’s global GSM-standard. The current hype is Wireless Future, an Oslo-based cluster of more than 200 companies, institutions and organisations that are pushing the envelope when it comes to the new wireless world.

 

Norway’s ICT space odyssey
Norway may not be the world’s biggest space nation, but it is certainly one of the most unique. Building on historical knowledge across a range of industries, Norway is of fundamental importance to the European Space Agency (ESA) and provides a bedrock of research and expertise within polar and maritime satellite surveillance, Aurora Borealis (Northern Lights) and solar observation, and various niche technologies including space-related ICT. Add to this the world’s most northerly and southerly ground stations – The Kjell Henriksen Observatory on Svalbard in the north, and Kongsberg Satellite Services’ TrollSat station in the Antarctic, and the impressive picture is complete.


Reshaping the medical world
“In health there is freedom. Health is the first of all liberties.” The words of Swiss writer Henri Frederic Amiel crystallize mankind’s unique dependence on its most fundamental, life-saving industry: medicine. There is arguably no other field where advances in technology and efficiency can have such a profound effect in terms of human cost. As a result, Norway is working hard to develop new ICT systems to improve all aspects of healthcare, from indoor positioning to simpler ways of sharing and recording patient information. 

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