Future Energy Challenges

All reliable examinations and analyses the last thirty years point in the same direction: The use of fossil fuels in the transport sector and the energy provision should not continue like today. The increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the same time period also gives rise to concern. In 1987, the international Brundtland Commission, led by Gro Harlem Brundtland, Prime Minister of Norway at the time, presented the report “Our common future”, the first overall and all-inclusive political analysis of the international environmental challenges. The concept “sustainable development” was launched here among other things. The report recommends the countries to change the energy consumption and to base their welfare on a sustainable development.

Introduction
All reliable examinations and analyses the last thirty years point in the same direction: The use of fossil fuels in the transport sector and the energy provision should not continue like today. The increase in greenhouse gas emissions in the same time period also gives rise to concern.


Possibilities for Norwegian players
This is very convenient for Norway. We already base the main part of our stationary power production on the renewable energy source large-scale hydropower. Besides, Norway has large related wind- and wave power resources along our long coast. The autumn 2006, The Low Emission Panel presented its analysis on how Norway best can reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. Here the great potential that lies in increasing the utilization of bioenergy was pointed out, both for district heating plants and as raw material for bioethanol, and in exploiting the enormous wind resources far at sea in the North Sea.

Obstacles for further expansion of renewable energy
The international energy agency IEA doesn’t only point to renewable energy sources as climate-friendly measures in a future society. In the report “World Energy Outlook 2006”, they point out that it is highly likely that the consumption of fossil fuels will increase, no matter how optimistic the scenarios are. This is because the main part of the increase will come about in China and India, which will base their consumption increase mainly on coal. Therefore IEA points at the capture and depositing of CO2 as an important method to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. Nuclear power will also be emphasized as a significant contribution.

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