Delivering products and finding solutions

One of the strengths of Norwegian industry lies in its commitment to sustainability and the environment as part of finding the best solutions possible. The advantages are many. The development of better and more efficient technology creates new business opportunities which in turn contribute to increased economic growth. The spread of national environmental technology on a global level ultimately encourages a more sustainable international trade. Norway’s goal is to play an important part of making business and industry sustainable on a global scale. This is especially true for the country’s processing and manufacturing industries.

Sylvia Brustad

The Norwegian export industry is closely related to our valuable natural resources, such as oil and gas, transport by sea, fisheries, forestry and utilization of hydropower. Directly associated with our highly developed and internationally competitive petroleum industry, there is a comprehensive and highly technology-based manufacturing industry. This includes pipe and processing technology, monitoring, control and maintenance. General manufacturing is also a major area of business, and a wide range of innovative Norwegian companies have specialized in creating machines, products and services that help other companies improve their manufacturing processes. These solutions are exported globally.
 
Utilization of our rich hydropower resources has brought important industrial expertise within various types of power intensive industries, including production and processing of aluminum, pulp and paper industry, as well as within the chemical industry. Competence within these traditional industries has in turn encouraged the development of new technology-based industries, such as the solar industry.
 
Norwegians are known for their ability to find solutions to demanding challenges within certain industrial areas. Nowhere is this more apparent than within manufacturing and process subcontracting, where Norwegian companies constantly specialize in improving the production processes. The high degree of worker’s participation and close cooperation between high and low skilled workers also contributes to this.
 
For people or companies looking to do business in Norway, the possibilities are many. Norway is a member of the European Economic Area (EEA) and hence a participant in the European Internal Market. The Internal Market is primarily focused on the four fundamental pillars – the “four freedoms” – freedom of the movement of goods, persons, services and capital. This promotes positive growth and development.
 
Norway is in a fortunate economic position. The industries and businesses that represent processing and manufacturing activities provide an excellent example of this strength. I hope you take the time to explore this issue that presents the best of processing, manufacturing and subcontracting Norway has to offer.

 

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