Connected to the world

One essential part of any region’s success lies in the ability of its logistic infrastructure to be flexible, cost-effective, on-time, and in-tune with both the needs of industry, as well as the demands of the ever-changing international business environment. One key to Greater Stavanger’s success in this area is the close coordination between local industry and the heart of the transportation in the region – the Port of Risavika, the Sola International Airport and Ganddal Godsterminal (Ganddal Freight Terminal).

The Port of Risavika enjoys a central location with close proximity to the Stavanger Airport, Sola, the railway and the centre of Stavanger with a number of major international service companies to the oil industry having their Norwegian headquarters in the direct vicinity. The port is positioned in an area that has been opened for industrial development, making it possible for companies to establish or expand their operations in the direct vicinity of the harbour.

Risavika is known as an important logistics hub in southwest Norway. The Port enjoys a strategically geographic location that makes it possible to export/import all kinds of goods to/from different destinations around the world. This type of logistical precision requires ongoing close communication with companies in the Stavanger Region and other areas in Norway as well as internationally. It is a port with a strong position with calls from international ports and as a link to ports farther north.

The centre of a highly professional logistics network, the Port of Risavika works with logistical services companies to ensure “just in time” satisfaction. Stavanger industry also depends upon the port to reach the global markets, and many companies have long enjoyed the services that Risavika provides. A strong “energy port”, Risavika is the base of the leading oil companies and a number of other companies that supplies the oil industry both in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea and beyond.


Risavika is well-positioned, making it possible for companies to establish or expand their operations in the direct vicinity of the harbour.
© Risavika Havn AS/ Frederik Ringe



A National & International Logistics Hub Takes Shape
The port is in a phase of formidable development, with a new international terminal opened in 2008. By 2010 the Port of Risavika will have established a new modern container terminal which will clearly position Risavika as Norway’s most advanced port with excellent capacity. After the expansion, the total harbour area will constitute 950 acres and 1,800 meters of berths.

Another reason that Risavika will continue to be a focal point for the development of new industry is a direct result of both excellent harbour facilities and its strategic location – in fact, Risavika is the country’s largest natural harbour area. In addition, the activities related to the Energy Park as well as the Risavika Gas Centre, a test centre for new technologies related to gas, will continue to create exciting synergies. The purpose of the Energy Park is to serve as a centre of research, development and commercialisation of future – oriented energy technology.

These types of activities, combined with the ongoing professional service provided as well as the result of the excellent harbor facilities and strategic geographic positioning will see Risavika continuing to be a focal point for the development of new industry – and allowing the harbor to maintain its position as both the largest and most advanced logistic hub in Norway.

Stavanger Airport, Sola – Traditionally Modern
Stavanger Airport, Sola celebrated its 70th birthday in 2007. Even though the airport has come of age, it is as vital and dynamic as ever and has experienced an explosive growth in facilities, routes and passengers over the last few years. The airport is a state-of-the-art facility playing an important role in a dynamic region, which is constantly adapting to the changes both the national and international requirements.

In 2008 the airport catered to approximately 4 million passengers, offering direct flights to nine national and 25 international destinations. In December 2008, a new extension of the national terminal was opened, increasing the number of gates by three. Further development of both the international and national part of the airport terminal is underway.

During 2010, a new airport hotel will open, offering 188 rooms and extensive meeting facilities, enforcing and facilitating the possibilities of doing effective business in the Greater Stavanger area. The establishment of a new Route Development Forum in the spring of 2009, where local and regional authorities and private companies will participate, will further the business-orientated development of Norway’s most productive airport and region.


Stavanger Airport, Sola, has experienced an explosive growth in facilities, routes and passengers over the last few years.
© Avinor



Connected to the World
In 2008 Ganddal Godsterminal (the Ganddal Freight Terminal) is the major logistics rail shipping link in the region, located near Ganddal in Sandnes. Built in 2007, it first opened for traffic in January 2008. After Oslo’s Alnabru Terminal, Ganddal Freight Terminal is the second largest in the country, well-equipped to handle the growing needs of Greater Stavanger.

Whether by rail, sea or air, the Greater Stavanger region is well-connected to both Norway as well as the international environment, and is well-prepared to offer newcomers and residents alike the best of logistic services now and in the future.

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