Arctic species is thriving

The total quota for North-East Arctic cod in 2012 is set at 751,000 tonnes. This is an increase of 48,000 tonnes on 2011. The increase in quota is very much a result of the Russian-Norwegian joint management of the stocks which has resulted in thriving Arctic fish stocks.

The total quota for cod is distributed between Norway, Russia and third-party countries according to the same model as previous years. Norway's quota this year is 339,857 tonnes. This quota includes coastal cod and a quota used for research purposes. This is an increase of 20,000 tonnes on 2011.

The stock of haddock is thriving, and the total quota for 2012 of 318,000 tonnes represents an increase of 15,000 tonnes on 2011. The Norwegian quota will be 153,253 tonnes, including the research quota, an increase of 4,503 tonnes.

The capelin quota for 2012 has been set at 320,000 tonnes, which is a reduction of 16 per cent on 2011. The Barents Sea capelin is managed according to a harvest control rule that ensures a spawning stock of at least 200,000 tonnes.The Russian-Norwegian joint management has resulted in thriving Arctic cod and other fish stocks.

In addition to the Norwegian quota of 191,000 tonnes, including research catches, the parties according to the Norwegian Department of Coastal Affairs and Fisheries, agreed a quota swap that involves Norway receiving a further 30,000 tonnes of capelin, while Russia receives 10,000 tonnes of Norwegian spring spawning (NVG) herring. This results in a total Norwegian capelin quota for 2012 of 221,000 tonnes.

The total quota for Greenland halibut in 2012 has increased by 3,000 tonnes to 18,000 tonnes. The quotas are based on advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES). All Norwegian arctic cod, haddock and herring fisheries are certified as sustainable in accordance with the MSC standards.

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